Video is prolific these days and is accessed to learn just about anything…how to change a tire, the art of happiness, how to unlock an iPhone, tips to minimalize your closet, etc. etc. Let’s go with the car analogy here. When it comes to creating learning videos, you might not need the Cadillac with all the bells and whistles when a Ford will get you to the same destination. In fact “down and dirty” videos developed and delivered quickly to your target audience will probably hit the mark in most cases.

Here are 5 things to think about when pulling together those “down and dirty” quick videos:

#1 Chunk your content. Don’t bite off more than you can chew or easily digest in one sitting. Think small here. You can always string together several videos to cover a concept. Figure out the true focus of your video and stick with it, leave out the extras like fabric protection, paint protection, rustproofing. You get it 😉

#2 Stoplight your messaging. To ensure smaller content, get out your red, yellow and green highlighters. Take your text (on screen and audio script) and highlight “have to know” content in green, “good to know” content in yellow and “nice to know” content in red. This is a great approach to streamlining your content and messaging.

#3 Add a little flair. Always be thinking about your end users! Is there audio, video, music or something compelling to keep their attention? It doesn’t have to be extravagant. Mix it up a bit to keep them engaged!

#4 Make it easy to find. Where will your end users access this content? Make the journey easy for them. The fewer clicks, sign-ins, and hunting for content the better.

#5 Let them know it’s out there! You might have an amazing set of videos available, but if people don’t know they exist, they won’t get watched. Communicate in a variety of ways (email, social media, flyers, intranet site, etc), but remember to keep those communications short and sweet too! Tips 1-4 apply here as well 🙂

That’s it! Dive in, create those engaging, quick hit videos and delight your end users!

Kathy Wachtel